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School of Art, Architecture + Design

Center for Integrative Photographic Studies

Lecture: Coco Fusco

Cuban Artists Confront the State

Host: CAHI

Thursday April 9, 2020 11:00 AM

Zoom,

Coco Fusco lecture: “The Unbearable Weight of Utopia: Cuban Artists Confront the State”

This event is open to members of the IU Community only

Register here for the Zoom link: https://events.iu.edu/cahi/view/event/date/20200409/event_id/98429

Coco Fusco has been pushing the boundaries between art, thought, and activism for thirty years. She explores race, war, gender, and questions of identity through performance, large-scale projections, web-based streaming, closed-circuit television, publication, sculpture, and forms of interactional aesthetics. From “Couple in a Cage” (1992-94), in which Fusco and Guillermo Gómez-Peña presented themselves in a cage as “undiscovered Amerindians”—a piece chosen for the 1993 Whitney Biennial—to new video work on contemporary Cuba, Fusco has assembled a body of work that truly deserves the appellation “interdisciplinary.”

Fusco is Andrew Banks Endowed Professor of Art at the University of Florida. She has exhibited around the world—Sydney, Shanghai, Porto Alegre, Johannesburg, and on and on—and has received the 2016 Greenfield Prize in Visual Art, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and the Absolut Art Award for Art Writing, among other recognitions. A Cuban-American herself, Fusco is author most recently of Dangerous Moves: Performance and Politics in Cuba (2015).

These events are co-sponsored by the College Arts + Humanities Institute, the Eskenazi School of Art, Architecture + Design, and the Department of Art History. For more information, please email cahi@indiana.edu or call (812) 856-1169.

Cancelled: Takashi Arai

CANCELLED

Host: CIPS

Tuesday March 10, 2020 7:00 PM

FA015, Indiana University Fine Arts

POSTPONED: In conjunction with IU/CDC travel restrictions, which prevent travel from Japan at this time. (Updated 3/2/2020)

Takashi Arai (1978-) is a Japanese visual artist and filmmaker. Arai first encountered photography while he was a university student of biology. In an effort to trace photography to its origins, he encountered daguerreotype, and after much trial and error mastered the complex technique. Since the beginning in 2010, when he first became interested in nuclear issues, Arai has used the daguerreotype technique to create individual records—micro-monuments—of his encounters - records that touch upon the fragmented reality of events in the past. Since 2017, Arai has been actively working as a researcher for interdisciplinary studies, such as “Interdisciplinary Studies of Radiation Effects on the Everyday Life of Victims” (National Museum of Ethnology).

Arai's works are included in collections such as SFMOMA, Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Tokyo Photographic Art Museum and Musee Guimet, among others.

In 2020, CIPS and Your Art Here will collaborate to unveil a billboard of Takashi's design with funding through the IU Public Arts Grant and the city of Bloomington.The billboard will display from February 15 - March 31, 2020 is located at 101 E 6th Street 47408 in downtown Bloomington.

Public Arts Grant

Seahorse

One Trans Man’s Story of Pregnancy and Birth

Host: IU Cinema

Wednesday February 12, 2020 7:00 PM

IU Cinema, 1213 E 7th St, Bloomington, IN 47406

Freddy McConnell and Director Jeanie Finlay are scheduled to be present.

Free, but ticketed. Visit cinema.indiana.edu for tickets.

This partnership is supported through IU Cinema’s Creative Collaborations program. Curated by Sarah Knott of the Department of History, with support from IU Cinema, the Department of Gender Studies, Center for Documentary Research and Practice, Center for Integrative Photographic Studies, Center for Sexual Health Promotion, and The Kinsey Institute.

Freddy is 30 and yearns to start a family, but for him this ordinary desire comes with unique challenges. He is a gay transgender man. Deciding to carry his own baby took years of soul searching, but nothing could prepare him for the reality of pregnancy, as both a physical experience and one that challenges society’s fundamental understanding of gender, parenthood, and family. This moving documentary follows Freddy McConnell’s pregnancy and birth, as he navigates fertility clinics, birth services, and a wealth of awkward, inspiring, telling conversations with family and friends. The experience remakes his relationships, his identity, and his future. Contains mature content.

Andy Mattern

Artist Talk

Host: Pictura Gallery

Friday February 7, 2020 7:00 PM

FAR Center for Contemporary Arts , 202 S. Rogers Street, Bloomington, IN 47404

Andy Mattern’s recent work engages photography’s aesthetic conventions and physical materials as subject matter. Since 2015, he has served as Assistant Professor of Photography and Digital Media at Oklahoma State University. His work is held in the permanent collections of SFMOMA, the New Mexico Museum of Art, the Tweed Museum of Art, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. His photographs have been reviewed in publications such as ARTFORUM, The New Yorker, Camera Austria, and Photonews. He holds an MFA in Photography from the University of Minnesota and a BFA in Studio Art from the University of New Mexico.

Optimal Conditions will be on view at the FAR Center for Contemporary Arts February 7th, 2020 to March 28th, 2020.

Friday February 7, 2020 6:00 PM

Powerplant, 415 N. 4th Street 47404

Empathy: An Exhibition of Collaborative Artwork Presented by the MFA Photography Department at the Eskenazi School of Art, Architecture and Design

Powerplant 415 W 4th Street, Bloomington, IN 47404 Friday, February 7th 6-9pm

Empathy is the cumulation of the collaborative effort of artists to come together and share life experiences. By bringing together a mix of artists and scholars, Empathy represents relationships and conversations in which photographers and collaborators get to glimpse into the encounters and daily challenges of individuals from other walks of life. The Indiana University Graduate Photography program proudly presents a wide array of partnerships that create a space for an open dialogue about identity, discrimination, and the culture of “otherness.”

Rania Matar

Artist Talk

Host: Eskenazi Museum of Art

Thursday January 30, 2020 5:30 PM

Kimberly and John Simpson Center for Education, Eskenazi Museum of Art, Indiana University

Rania Matar was born and raised in Lebanon and moved to the U.S. in 1984. As a Lebanese-born American woman and mother, Matar's cultural background, cross-cultural experience, and personal narrative inform her photography. She has dedicated her work to exploring issues of personal and collective identity, through photographs of female adolescence and womanhood – both in the United States where she lives and the Middle East where she is from, in an effort to focus on notions of identity and individuality all within the context of the underlying universality of these experiences. She has received several grants and awards including a 2018 Guggenheim Fellowship. Her work is in the permanent collections of several museums, institutions and private collections worldwide.

The Eskenazi Museum of Art recently acquired her work Darine 7 and Dania 8, Beirut Lebanon, 2014 from the series L'Enfant Femme.

Jay Turner Frey Seawell

Noon Talk

Host: CIPS

Friday November 1, 2019 12:00 PM

Fine Arts RM 020, Indiana University Bloomington,

Jay Turner Frey Seawell is a photographer based in Los Angeles,CA. He earned his MFA in Photography from Columbia College Chicago. His photographs have been included in numerous exhibitions in the United States as well as the Pingyao International Photography Festival in China. Seawell is a two-time nominee of The Baum Award for An Emerging American Photographer. His work is in the permanent collections of the Museum of Contemporary Photography and the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University. Seawell is the 2016 recipient of the Award for Innovation in the Documentary Arts from the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University. His first photobook National Trust was published by Skylark Editions. Seawell was a winner of the Magenta Foundation Flash Forward competition in 2018.

Thomas Hocker

Noon Talk

Host: CIPS

Friday October 25, 2019 12:00 PM

Fine Arts RM 020, Indiana University Bloomington,

Born in Sherman, Texas, Hocker completed a BA in history at Rice University (1966) and a MS in photography from the Institute of Design at the Illinois Insititute of Technology, Chicago (1969). He has worked as a photographer for the United States Army and Inland Steel Corporation, and has taught photography at Purdue University, in Calumet, Indiana and a number of other subjects over the years, including Central America, immigration and the celebration of quinceañeras in Northwest Indiana and Chicago's South Side. He's traveled the world and shot everything from tensions between Catholics and Protestants in Northern Ireland to Eastern European culture at Orthodox churches in Northwest Indiana.

Mary Goodwin

Guest Lecture

Host: CIPS

Thursday October 17, 2019 4:30 PM

Fine Arts RM 020, Indiana University Bloomington,

Founder and Publisher of Waltz Books in Indianapolis, Indiana

As a small business owner, Mary Goodwin attends to every aspect of producing, promoting, and distributing cutting-edge photo books that contribute to the dialog on contemporary photography. Goodwin works with various teams, including photographers, designers, production managers, and warehouse personnel, to fulfill the artistic vision as well as collaborates with artists to perfect image selection and sequence within the book format. Waltz Books contributes to the dialog on contemporary art by providing creative and financial support for the production of ground-breaking photobooks by collaborating with a wide variety of artists, book designers, and printers. Providing an independent forum for innovative photobook projects, Waltz Books seeks projects that require a close relationship between the book format and the photographic image and offers support to artists who wish to self-publish.

Image: On a Wet Bough by Keliy Anderson-Staley, published by Waltz Books

Joshua Dudley Greer

Noon Talk

Host: CIPS

Friday October 4, 2019 12:00 PM

Cancelled,

Joshua Dudley Greer (b. 1980 Hazleton, PA) is a photographer based in Atlanta, GA where he teaches photography at Georgia State University. His work has appeared in The California Sunday Magazine, PDN, Le Monde, The Georgia Review, GUP Magazine and Oxford American and is in the permanent collections of the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, the New York Public Library, the Do Good Fund and the High Museum of Art.

Jeremy Hogan

Noon Talk

Host: CIPS

Thursday February 21, 2019 12:00 PM

Fine Arts 020, Indiana University

Jeremy Hogan was born and raised in California and began freelancing for newspapers while still in high school. He is a graduate of the photojournalism program at San Jose State University, and has a bachelor of Science Degree in Journalism. After a series of internships he began working for The Herald-Times, a small newspaper in Bloomington, Indiana, but has always pursued personal projects on his own. He is represented by Polaris Images for still photography, and is a contributing filmaker to Getty Images. His interests are many, but his time is limited. He is currently making a documentary film about Vietnam Veterans from his father's combat unit during the war, among his many projects. Last year he took time off work and covered the 2016 presidential election.

Anne Tucker

Mentoring: to give, receive and remember

Host: McKinney Visiting Artist Series

Friday January 25, 2019 5:00 PM

Fine Arts 015, Indiana University

Anne Wilkes Tucker is the curator emerita of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, having, in 1976, become founding curator of the photography department for which she acquired over 30,000 photographs made on all seven continents. She curated or co-curated over 40 exhibitions, most with accompanying catalogues, including surveys on the Czech Avant-garde, a history of Japanese photography, and a history of war photography as well as exhibitions with catalogues on works of Robert Frank, Brassai, Catherine Wagner, Joel Sternfeld, Richard Misrach, Ray Metzker, Louis Faurer, George Krause, and Chen Changfan. Published and soon-to-be published interviews with photographers include Erika Diettes, Mark Klett, and Brad Temkin. She has also contributed articles to over 150 magazines, books and other catalogues and has lectured throughout the North and South America, Europe, Africa, and Asia. Her honors, fellowships, and awards include being selected as “American’s Best Curator” by Time Magazine in 2001 in an issue devoted to America’s Best as well as Randolph-Macon Woman's College’s, Alumnae Achievement Award in 1993. She has been a trustee of FotoFest since 1990 and the Philip and Edith Leonian Foundation since 2016 and served as a trustee of Randolph College between 2008 - 2018

While continuing to work in retirement (friends have pronounced her a failure at retirement), she is an active gardener, Astros fan, movie buff, and reader. Robert Morris, architect and painter is her life partner.

Anne Tucker

Noon Talk, in conversation with Elizabeth Claffey

Thursday January 24, 2019 12:00 PM

Fine Arts 020, Indiana University

Anne Wilkes Tucker is the curator emerita of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, having, in 1976, become founding curator of the photography department for which she acquired over 30,000 photographs made on all seven continents. She curated or co-curated over 40 exhibitions, most with accompanying catalogues, including surveys on the Czech Avant-garde, a history of Japanese photography, and a history of war photography as well as exhibitions with catalogues on works of Robert Frank, Brassai, Catherine Wagner, Joel Sternfeld, Richard Misrach, Ray Metzker, Louis Faurer, George Krause, and Chen Changfan. Published and soon-to-be published interviews with photographers include Erika Diettes, Mark Klett, and Brad Temkin. She has also contributed articles to over 150 magazines, books and other catalogues and has lectured throughout the North and South America, Europe, Africa, and Asia. Her honors, fellowships, and awards include being selected as “American’s Best Curator” by Time Magazine in 2001 in an issue devoted to America’s Best as well as Randolph-Macon Woman's College’s, Alumnae Achievement Award in 1993. She has been a trustee of FotoFest since 1990 and the Philip and Edith Leonian Foundation since 2016 and served as a trustee of Randolph College between 2008 - 2018

While continuing to work in retirement (friends have pronounced her a failure at retirement), she is an active gardener, Astros fan, movie buff, and reader. Robert Morris, architect and painter is her life partner.

Luz Obscura

A Film by Susana de Sousa Dias, with discussion by the director

Host: Center for Documentary Research and Practice

Thursday September 27, 2018 7:00 PM

IU Cinema, Indiana University

Drawing on identity photos taken by the Portuguese political police during the dictatorship, Susana de Sousa Dias explores the possibility of representing a repressed history and giving an account of the torture now erased. In her use of photos and testimonies from those close to an assassinated communist activist during the Salazar dictatorship, Luz Obscura invents a form that reveals how an authoritarian system operates within family intimacy and recreates the feeling of a family's broken identity. In Portuguese with English subtitles.

Susana de Sousa Dias is an award-winning Portuguese independent filmmaker. She teaches New Media at the Faculty of Fine Arts of the University of Lisbon and is an author of diverse essays on cinema, mainly dealing with subjects related to her work.

This event is part of the film series, “Women Filmmakers at the Intersection of Documentary, Video Art, and Avant Garde,” curated by Joshua Malitsky and Masha Vlasova. This series is sponsored by the Center for Documentary Research and Practice; the School of Art, Architecture + Design; and IU Cinema. This partnership is supported through IU Cinema’s Creative Collaborations program and the College Arts and Humanities Institute.

Isabelle le Minh

Lecture

Host: McKinney Visiting Artist Series

Friday September 14, 2018 5:00 PM

Fine Arts 015, Indiana University

Born in Germany, lives and works in Nogent-sur-Marne, France.

After a degree in Materials Science Engineering, Isabelle Le Minh settled in Berlin in 1989 to work as a patent engineer. She finally left behind her career to attend the École Nationale Supérieure de la Photographie d’Arles in 1993. After graduating, she developped a photographic work combining conceptual and documentary approaches. The digital revolution led her to then drift away from photography to reflect upon the image in a broader way.

Le Minh was nominated for the Vevey Book Award (2017), the Luma Book Award (2016), the Niépce Prize (2014) and the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize (longlist, 2012). She is the winner of the Adagp Artist Book Prize (2016), and was awarded of a grant from the National Foundation for Fine Arts (2013). Her work, has been exhibited in numerous venues and festivals, such as The Month of Photography in Montreal, the Rencontres d’Arles, Paris Photo, the Ile-de-France Center for Photography, the Frac Normandy Rouen, the French Society of Photography, the Maison Rouge in Paris, the Mulhouse Museum of Fine Art, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Krakow, Riga Art Space, Dorfman Projects New York, etc.

Le Minh teaches at the Rouen High School of Art and is also a curator. She is represented by the Galerie Christophe Gaillard in Paris.

Steve Raymer

Noon Talk

Wednesday April 18, 2018 12:00 PM

FA 020, Indiana University

Photojournalist, author, and educator Steve Raymer — a long-time National Geographic Magazine staff photographer and senior editor — taught visual journalism, media ethics, international newsgathering, and reporting war and terrorism at the Indiana University Media School for 21 years.

After serving as an officer in the United States Army, he joined the staff of National Geographic in 1972, launching a career that has taken him to more than 100 countries. From famines in Bangladesh and Ethiopia to the collapse of the Soviet Union, Raymer’s photographs illustrated more than 30 bylined National Geographic Magazine articles, as well as numerous other Geographic articles, books, and multimedia presentations.

Among his notable National Geographic stories were pieces about the global hunger crisis (1975), the construction of the trans-Alaska oil pipeline (1976), the worldwide illegal trade in endangered animals (1981), Afghanistan’s capital of Kabul under Soviet occupation (1985), the humanitarian work of the International Committee of the Red Cross in more than a dozen war zones around the world (1986), the explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine (1987), and the tumultuous birth of a new and independent Russia (1990, 1991, 1993).

In 2018, Indiana University Press will publish his photographic memoir titled Somewhere West of Lonely: My Life in Pictures. To learn more about Steve, visit his website: https://www.steveraymer.com/.

Richard Ross

Lecture

Host: OVPR at IU Bloomington & the Arts and Humanities Council IU Bloomington

Thursday April 5, 2018 4:00 PM

Woodburn Hall Room 100, Indiana University

Richard Ross will talk about his Juvenile in Justice series and his experience documenting incarcerated youth throughout America. Ross is a photographer, researcher and professor of art based in Santa Barbara, California.

Ross has been the recipient of grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Annie E. Casey and MacArthur Foundations. Ross was awarded both Fulbright and Guggenheim Fellowships. His most recent work, the Juvenile In Justice series, turns a lens on the placement and treatment of American juveniles housed by law in facilities that treat, confine, punish, assist and, occasionally, harm them. Two books and traveling exhibitions of the work continue to see great success while Ross collaborates with juvenile justice stakeholders, using the images as a catalyst for change.

Ross's exbhibition, Juvenile In Justice, will be opening later that evening at 7:30pm in the City Hall Showers Building Atrium. To view the full schedule of events, visit the Eskenazi Museum's website.

The full two days of events are funded by the Office of the Vice Provost of Research and the Arts and Humanities Council at Indiana University Bloomington through the Public Arts Grant and are supported by the City of Bloomington, IU Eskenazi Museum of Art, IU Media School, Your Art Here, Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center, Ivy Tech Center for Lifelong Learning, Monster House Press, Rhino's Youth Center, Pages to Prisoners, and the Center for Integrative Photographic Studies.

Patrick Fraser

Noon Talk

Wednesday February 14, 2018 12:00 PM

Fine Arts 020, Indiana University

Patrick Fraser is a British photographer and filmmaker. He photographs editorial features for magazines like Vanity Fair, British Vogue and Esquire as well as color supplements The Sunday Times, Observer and Guardian. His portrait work has been exhibited at the National Portrait Gallery in London. Patrick continues to make documentary and experimental films and his first narrative short film will be released this year, in 2018. To learn more about Patrick Fraser, visit his website.

Ariella Azoulay

Lecture

Host: Center for Documentary Research and Practice

Friday December 1, 2017 4:30 PM

Fine Arts 102, Indiana University

Ariella Azoulay is a Professor of Modern Culture and Media and the Department of Comparative Literature at Brown University. Azoulay studies revolutions from the 18th century onward and investigates how historical knowledge is portrayed through photographs, sketches, cinema, and other visual media. The Israeli political regime has been a primary focus of her work.

An expert in visual culture and photography, Ariella Azoulay focuses her research on how history is told through visual mediums — photographs, film, drawings, and other visual elements — and how these provide a level of detail and context not provided solely by the written word. She comes to Brown from a rich career of teaching, writing, and curating in Tel Aviv.

She is Curator of the archive "Act of State 1967-2007" ( Centre Pompidou, 2016), Enough! The Natural Violence of the New World Order (F/Stop festival, Leipzig, 2016), "The Natural History of Rape," Pembroke Hall, Brown University, “The Body Politic” [in Really Useful Knowledge, curated by What, How & for Whom / WHW], Reina Sofia, Madrid; When The Body Politic Ceases To Be An Idea, Exhibition Room - Manifesta Journal Around Curatorial Practices No 16 (folded format in Hebrew, MOBY, 2013), Potential History (2012, Stuk / Artefact, Louven), Untaken Photographs (2010, Igor Zabel Award, The Moderna galerija, Lubliana; Zochrot, Tel Aviv), Architecture of Destruction (Zochrot, Tel Aviv), and Everything Could Be Seen (Um El Fahem Gallery of Art). Azoulay is a director of documentary films, including Civil Alliances, Palestine, 47-48 (2012), I Also Dwell Among Your Own People: Conversations with Azmi Bishara (2004), The Food Chain (2004).

This lecture cosponsored by the Indiana University Center for Documentary Research and Practice and the Borns Jewish Studies Program.

To learn more about Azoulay's work, visit her website at http://cargocollective.com/AriellaAzoulay.

Priya Kambli

Kinship, Lecture

Host: Grunwald Gallery

Thursday November 2, 2017 5:30 PM

Grunwald Gallery, Indiana University

Through the work of artist photographers Tara Bogart, Elizabeth M. Claffey, Joy Christiansen Erb, Letitia Huckaby, Priya Kambli and Rachelle Mozman, Kinship examines the influence of family life on personal and cultural identity. Each artist delves into the complex nature of family structures to express how it shapes internal dialogue and personal narrative. Through various avenues of investigation such as family lore and heritage, this exhibition addresses what it means to embody familial identity, while experiencing otherness within a public and private context. Within a patriarchal system, knowledge and inquiry are considered currency of the public sphere. Kinship aims to challenge this assumption by exploring the deep knowledge base developed through living in and observing domestic space, caring for others, and nourishing family. Mainstream media representations of home can reinforce normative scripts that fail to express the conflicts and rewards of family life. Through the efforts of these six artists, the viewer might consider the value of womanhood and the multifaceted roles that women play within the domestic sphere.

Power of Words: James Nakagawa

Gallery Talk

Friday October 20, 2017 12:00 PM

Grunwald Gallery, Indiana University

In conjunction with the Power of Words lecture series, hosted by Friends of the Library and the Monroe County Public Library, James Nakgawa will be giving a gallery talk in the Grunwald Gallery. Osamu James Nakagawa is the Ruth N. Halls professor of Photography at Indiana University. Nakagawa is a recipient of the 2009 John Simon Guggenheim fellowship and 2010 Higashikawa A New Photographer Award in Japan. His collaborative exhibition, A Shared Elegy, including the work of Emmet Gowin, Elijah Gowin, and Takayuki Ogawa will be on view in the Grunwald Gallery from Friday, October 13, 2017 to Thursday, November 16, 2017.

This talk is part of the Monroe County Public Library's Power of Words series. It is brought to you through a partnership between the IU Eskenazi Museum of Art, the Friends of the Library, and the Monroe County Public Library.

A Shared Elegy

Symposium

Host: Grunwald Gallery

Friday October 13, 2017

Grunwald Gallery, Indiana University

Panel Discussion:

Emmet Gowin, Elijah Gowin, James Nakagawa, and Yoshiko Suzuki.

Moderated by Joel Smith 3:00 PM, Fine Arts Room 015

Lecture:

Emmet Gowin

5:00pm, FA 015 - McKinney Visiting Artist Series

Opening Reception:

6-8pm, Grunwald Gallery

A Shared Elegy presents the work of four photographers connected by family ties. Osamu James Nakagawa and his uncle Takayuki Ogawa, and Elijah Gowin and his father Emmet Gowin present unique but overlapping visions recording family histories. Nakagawa, like his uncle Ogawa, grew up in Japan and draws upon his country’s traditions and the practice of honoring elders. Family heritage and home in Virginia have inspired the Gowins to make photographs that depict the intimate and hallowed nature of the world. These photographs compel us to reflect on our own lineage and consider our place in the progression of generations and the cycle of life.

The three exhibiting photographers have been invited to participate in a panel discussion moderated by Joel Smith, Curator of Photography at the Morgan Library and an essayist for the book. In addition, Yoshiko Suzuki, Curator at the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography will serve on the panel and participate in the events. A 108-page book, A Shared Elegy, will be produced in collaboration with the Indiana University Eskenazi Museum of Art and distributed through IU Press. A Shared Elegy exhibition is scheduled to travel to the Shadai Gallery, Tokyo Polytechnic University in 2018.

For the full schedule of events:
https://studioart.indiana.edu/grunwald/exhibitions/current-upcoming-exhibitions/a-shared-elegy.html

Light/Matter: The Intersection of Photography and Printmaking

Symposium

Host: Grunwald Gallery

Wednesday August 23, 2017 to Friday August 25, 2017

Various, Indiana University

Light/Matter is an exhibition curated by Tracy Templeton, Associate Professor in Studio Art at Indiana University; Walter Jule, Professor Emeritus at the University of Alberta and Ingrid Ledent, Professor at the Royal Academy of Fine Art in Antwerp, Belgium. The exhibition will feature up to seventy works by forty-five artists spanning sixteen countries in Europe, North America, South America and Asia.

Beginning in the mid 20th century, the photo print revolution created a new graphic language through the fusion of photographic imagery and analog print techniques that continues to shape global “visual literacy” in the digital age. Light/Matter marks the first time a major museum exhibition has presented groundbreaking works by several generations of artists who have made significant contributions to the photo-print movement. The exhibition will also serve to illustrate the ways in which cultural factors and traditions have influenced the adoption and evolution of new print technologies.

This exhibition and symposium is made possible by the New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities, the College Arts and Humanities Institute and the Center for Integrative Photographic Studies, McKinney Visiting Artist Lecture Series, the IU Student Association and the Print Workshop, all at Indiana University.

Wednesday, August 23

Introductory Lecture by Walter Jule (Canada) 5:30 – 6:30pm, Fine Arts 015
Open House Tours of Printmaking Studios and Reception 6:30 – 8:00pm, Arts Annex

Thursday, August 24

Noon Hour Slide Lectures by Exhibiting Artists 12:00– 1:00pm, Memorial Union, Oak Rm
Lecture by Nan Brewer – Pop Art and Printmaking 1:00 – 1:30pm, Memorial Union, Oak Rm
Lecture by Ingrid Ledent (Belgium) 4:30 – 5:30pm, Psychology, 100
Lecture by Alicia Candiani (Argentina) 5:30 – 6:30pm, Psychology, 100

Friday, August 25

Noon Lectures by Exhibiting Artists 12:00 – 1:00pm, Global Int. 0001
Panel Discussion 3:00 – 4:30pm, Theatre Drama Center A201
McKinney Lecture by Tetsuya Noda (Japan) 5:00 – 6:00pm, Fine Arts 015
Opening Reception of Light/Matter 6:00 – 8:00pm, Grunwald Gallery


For more details:
https://studioart.indiana.edu/grunwald/exhibitions/current-upcoming-exhibitions/light-matter.html

Brad Temkin

What We Leave Behind

Friday April 21, 2017 5:00 PM

Fine Arts 102, Indiana University

Brad Temkin is best known for his photographs of contemporary landscape. His work is held in numerous permanent collections, including The Art Institute of Chicago; Milwaukee Art Museum; Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; and Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago. His images have appeared in such publications as Aperture, TIME Magazine and European Photography. A monograph of Temkin’s work entitled Private Places: Photographs of Chicago Gardens (Center for American Places) was published in 2005. Temkin’s second book entitled ROOFTOP (Radius Books) was released Fall 2015. He has been an adjunct professor at Columbia College in Chicago since 1984.

Jeff Wolin: Pigeon Hill Then & Now

Book Signing

Friday April 7, 2017 6:20 PM

Pictura Gallery, 122 W 6th Street Bloomington, IN

Jeffrey Wolin's new book, "Pigeon Hill: Then & Now" documents a Bloomington, IN community across three decades. Sparked by the death of Hill resident and IU graduate student Ellen Marks in 1986, Wolin became interested in the low-income neighboorhood and began to make portraits of the residents, a practice which he continued for four years. Decades later, a second murder brought Wolin back to Pigeon Hill. Crystal Grubb, a wife and mother whom Wolin had photographed as a young girl.

"Pigeon Hill: Then and Now" is an epic exploration of the ways in which experiences in life – good and bad – are written into the faces of this community. Please join us to celebrate with Jeff Wolin. The book will be on sale at Pictura.

Chee Wang Ng

Noon Talk

Thursday April 6, 2017 1:00 PM

Fine Arts 020, Indiana University

Born in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, to parents of Chinese descent, Chee Wang Ng lives and works in New York City. Ng earned his BFA in Architecture from Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, RI. His work has been featured in film festivals and included in group exhibitions at the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Museum of Contemporary Craft, Asian American Arts Centre, Museum of Chinese in America,and 22.dokumentART in Szczecin, Poland. Ng's work including large-scale conceptual photography, video, and installation work will be on view at the Eskenazi Museum of Art from March 11–May 7, 2017.

Faye Gleisser

Indexing Touch

Friday February 24, 2017 12:00 PM

Harlos House, E. 10th St. Bloomington, IN,

Faye Gleisser is a curator, poet, and art historian, based in Bloomington, Indiana where she is an Assistant Professor of Contemporary Art. She has worked in a number of art institutions, including but not limited to the Pulitzer Foundation in St. Louis, Art Institute of Chicago, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, and National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.​ Gleisser completed her Ph.D. in Art History at Northwestern University. Her doctoral research focused on U.S.-based performance artists’ appropriation and deployment of guerrilla tactics in urban centers throughout the 1970s. More broadly, her research considers articulations of race and gender in contemporary art and the violence of the photographic archive. Her art criticism has appeared in Artforum, Aperture, and NewCriticals. Image credit: Fazal Sheikh, from "The Victor Weeps."

Mariko Takeuchi

McKinney Lecture

Host: Grunwald Gallery

Friday February 3, 2017 5:00 PM

Fine Arts 015, Indiana University

Mariko Takeuchi is a photography critic, independent curator and associate professor of Kyoto University of Art and Design. She has been a visiting researcher of the National Museum of Art, Osaka, and the National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo. Takeuchi was also guest curator for the Spotlight on Japan of Paris Photo 2008, and received a Fulbright Grant for her research on photography education in the US. In 2016 she was curator of the Japan section at the Dubai Photo Exhibition. Takeuchi is based in Kyoto, Japan, and has a M.A. in Arts from Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan. Image credit: Lieko Shiga, "Wedding Veil." This lecture is a part of the McKinney Lecture series.

Elijah Gowin

Faith, Doubt, and Photographs

Friday January 20, 2017 5:00 PM

Fine Arts 120, Indiana University

Elijah Gowin uses photography to speak about landscape and the human experience in moments of spiritual and physical transition.

Born in Dayton, Ohio in 1967 Gowin received his MFA in Photography from the University of New Mexico. His photographs are in the collections of the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Center for Creative Photography, among others. Gowin founded Tin Roof Press to publish his books on art and photography including “Maggie” in 2009 and his monograph "Of Falling and Floating" in 2011. He is a Professor at the University of Missouri-Kansas City where he directs photographic studies. Gowin was awarded the John S. Guggenheim Fellowship in 2008.

Rania Matar

Lecture

Friday November 11, 2016 7:00 PM

Pictura Gallery, 122 W 6th St Bloomington, IN

Rania Matar was born and raised in Lebanon and moved to the U.S. in 1984. Originally trained as an architect at the American University of Beirut and at Cornell University, she studied photography at the New England School of Photography and the Maine Photographic Workshops. Matar started teaching photography in 2009 and offered summer photography workshops to teenage girls in Lebanon's refugee camps with the assistance of non-governmental organizations.

Matar's work focuses on girls and women. She documents her life through the lives of those around her, focusing on the personal and the mundane in an attempt to portray the universal within the personal. Her work has won several awards, has been featured in numerous publications, and exhibited widely in the U.S. and internationally. Her images are in the permanent collections of several museums worldwide. She teaches Personal Documentary Photography at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design.

Walker Pickering

Noon Talk

Tuesday November 1, 2016 5:03 PM

Fine Arts 022, 700 E 10th St. Bloomington, IN

Walker Pickering will be visiting us this Wednesday from Lincoln, Nebraska. His work was recently featured in the Pictura Gallery show, New Americana.

Walker's photographs range from marching bands to his ancestral homeland in the American Deep South. A native Texan, he lives in the Midwest where he teaches photography, video, and bookmaking at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. His work has been exhibited throughout the United States and internationally, and is included in a number of private and public collections, including the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston and The Wittliff Collection of Southwestern & Mexican Photography. He is the recipient of the 2013 Clarence John Laughlin Award.

We hope to see you there.

Rosamond Purcell

Noon Talk

Friday October 14, 2016 12:00 PM

Harlos House, Indiana University

Purcell's incredible body of work, which includes three collaborations with the late Harvard paleontologist and evolutionary biologist Stephen Jay Gould and award-winning books such as Egg & Nest and Owl's Head: On the Nature of Lost Things, was recently celebrated in Molly Bernstein's outstanding documentary An Art That Nature Makes. Purcell's installation Museum Wormianum, a recreation of the "wonder cabinet" of 17th century Danish naturalist Ole Worm, was seen at the Santa Monica Museum of Art and the Natural History Museum in Denmark. According to Jonathan Safran Foer, Purcell's originality "defies category." Her visit to IU will begin with a conversation with author Christoph Irmscher on Thursday, October 13 at noon in the library of Harlos House 1331 East 10th Street, right across from the Tenth Street entrance of the Herman B Wells Library.